An illiberal state in the heart of Europe

Between 2010 and 2014, an 'illiberal state' was being built in Hungary. In line with prime minister's announcement on the subject, from 2014 we have been offered a perspective on how an actual, consolidated illiberal democracy operates.

Hungary remains part of the European Union (EU), but its actions contradict the fundamental principles of the EU. Elections, although held at regular intervals, are not free and fair. Even though constitutional institutions do exist, they do not operate in a manner befitting such institutions; that is, they do not act as checks and balances on governmental power but instead facilitate its operation. Read our full publication about the topic, which has been prepared by five Hungarian NGO's (Eötvös Károly Policy Institute, Hungarian Helsinki Committee, the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union, K-Monitor, Mérték Media Monitor).

Read our summary too about the Disrespect for European Values in Hungary, 2010-2014

Share

Related articles

International Drug Policy Reform Conference Videos I.

The Drugreporter was the official filmmaker of the International Drug Policy Reform Conference 2013 in Denver, Colorado. Watch our movies produced at this great event! First part with videos from the opening and closing sessions.

Hungarian Church Law Is Deemed Unconstitutional

The latest decision of the Constitutional Court (CC) was established partly due to the constitutional complaints submitted by the HCLU. The decision states that the main provisions of the Church Law, which came into effect last year, are in serious violation of fundamental rights and the principles of the rule of law. This decision, however, is not expected to remedy the harm suffered by the denominations concerned, because the Fundamental Law of Hungary is proposed to amend with the annulled provisions by the Parliament.

Hungarian Government and Parliament should respect European Court of Human Rights judgment

On Friday 20 April 2012, the Hungarian Minister of Justice and Public Administration, Mr. Tibor Navracsics submitted to Parliament a draft Parliamentary Resolution to not execute the judgment of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) taken in the case of Fratanolo v Hungary. The judgment, handed down by the Strasbourg-based court in November 2011, is the second such decision establishing that Hungary had violated the right to freedom of expression protected by the European Convention on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms by criminalizing the wearing of the red star in public. Under the minister’s proposal, the penal provision should remain in effect and Hungary should not pay the just satisfaction awarded by the ECtHR.