An illiberal state in the heart of Europe

Between 2010 and 2014, an 'illiberal state' was being built in Hungary. In line with prime minister's announcement on the subject, from 2014 we have been offered a perspective on how an actual, consolidated illiberal democracy operates.

Hungary remains part of the European Union (EU), but its actions contradict the fundamental principles of the EU. Elections, although held at regular intervals, are not free and fair. Even though constitutional institutions do exist, they do not operate in a manner befitting such institutions; that is, they do not act as checks and balances on governmental power but instead facilitate its operation. Read our full publication about the topic, which has been prepared by five Hungarian NGO's (Eötvös Károly Policy Institute, Hungarian Helsinki Committee, the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union, K-Monitor, Mérték Media Monitor).

Read our summary too about the Disrespect for European Values in Hungary, 2010-2014

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