Breaking Down the Vienna Consensus on Drugs

The consensus behind global drug prohibition is fading - watch the new video we filmed at the high level UN meeting in Vienna and find out why!

In 2009, the member states of the United Nations reaffirmed the dream of a drug-free world, adopting a political declaration which aimed to eliminate or significantly reduce drug trafficking within ten years. Five years later, a high-level segment of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND) was convened in Vienna, to discuss the mid-term review of the implementation of this plan. The meeting revealed a growing depth of disagreement on global drug policies. Most governments think the UN is on the right track, and that with more commitment and resources, it will be possible to improve the fight against drugs. But dissonant voices are getting stronger. Many governments are now disillusioned by the overwhelming evidence that punitive drug policies do not work. and are pushing for a debate on the alternatives. Some of them are in open rebellion against the drug conventions - such as Uruguay, which has introduced legal regulation of cannabis production and distribution for recreational use. What are the key issues that divide the United Nations? Is the international drug control system losing relevance? What can we expect from the UN General Assembly on Drugs in 2016? The film we produced in Vienna aims to provide answers to these questions.     

Read the CND blog for more information!

Posted by Peter Sarosi
Video: Istvan Gabor Takács and Peter Sarosi

Share

Related articles

HCLU Film Portfolio 2011

The HCLU produced 140 online videos in 2011. Each year we make a picture illustrated interactive portfolio which explains our activities and briefly introduces the films. We proudly present the 2011 issue. Enjoy and share!

HCLU Film 2010

In 2010 HCLU produced 127 videos. There are 91 foreign language (English or Russian) and 36 Hungarian language videos. Besides drug policy, we produced many interesting films in the fields of HIV/AIDS and human rights, disability rights, freedom of speech and freedom of information, and within the framework of the HCLU's roma program on the issues of roma rights. All our films from 2010 are available from this picture illustrated portfolio.

Gypsies did not have access to the donations collected to benefit flood victims

The local branch of the ’Jobbik’ party in Monor (a town in Hungary), has an ongoing collection for the benefit of flood victims.  The flood has damaged 17 houses in the township, of which 5 are inhabited by Gypsies. 

A ’Jobbik’ party activist, in charge of distributing donations, has not given any aid to the Gypsy victims- clearly stating it was due to their lineage.  She had apportioned parts of the donations for non-Gypsy born people who were not affected by the flood, but were considered ’Jobbik’ voters.  Online descriptions of the donations emphasize that the contents will only benefit ’Hungarians.’