Budapest Homeless Ban Limited by Supreme Court

The Hungarian Supreme Court has once again nullified certain sections of a regulation issued by the municipality of Budapest that marks the illicit zones where sleeping on the street may be punished. 

HCLU is concerned because, as in the case of its earlier decision, the court has again raised only formal objections, without challenging those aspects of the regulation that violate human dignity. HCLU had affirmed in an earlier statement that the criminalization of homelessness not only violates human dignity but also lacks social sensitivity, being inhuman as well as totally nonsensical.

Source of the picture: http://www.liberties.eu/en/short-news/2875

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