Budapest Pride March to the Parliament Given Green Light

The Metropolitan Court granted the appeal of the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union and the Hungarian Helsinki Committee and overruled the prohibiting decision of the police. Thus the participants of the Budapest Pride can march from Heroes’ Square to Kossuth Square in 2011.

 The Metropolitan Court granted the appeal of the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union and the Hungarian Helsinki Committee on February 18, 2011, and overruled the decision of the Budapest Municipal Police Headquarters prohibiting the Budapest Pride March. 

“ HCLU is pleased that according to the decision of the Court anyone’s right to assembly has equal importance and deserves equal protection in Hungary.” - declared his views on the case Tamás Szigeti, the employee of Freedom of Speech and Assembly Program of HCLU.

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