Danny Kushlick - Is marijuana more dangerous today?

Danny Kushlick is director of Transform Drug Policy Foundation. A former drug counsellor in the criminal justice system, he founded Transform in 1996 after recognising that prohibition caused his clients more problems than their drug use.



Danny Kushlick is director of Transform Drug Policy Foundation. A former drug counsellor in the criminal justice system, he founded Transform in 1996 after recognising that prohibition caused his clients more problems than their drug use. Transform is the UK's leading campaign for an effective drug policy based on the legal regulation and control of drugs. He is a leading contributor to the drug law reform debate in the media, among policy-makers and in the NGO arena.

He is co-author of After the War on Drugs: Options for Control (2004). He is also a member of the executive council of the International Harm Reduction Association, and is a co-opted member of the Advisory Council of the British Society of Criminology. His criticism of the Independent on Sunday article - which claimed that marijuana today is more dangerous and therefore it should not be legalized - is available here.

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