Garbage trucks do not enter Gypsy settlement

It is a common occurrence in Borsod county in Hungary, that where the Gypsy settlements begin, paved roads end.  There is no running water or sewage system, and the local government does not provide waste removal services.
Such areas are treated as if they were not public places, as though the communal and civil service obligations of the local governments stopped at the borders of the Gypsy settlements.  

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Most people hardly hear or know anything about the living conditions and everyday
concerns of the Roma population living in extreme poverty, often in segregated
settlements.
During their visits in North-Eastern Hungary, our colleagues interview locals
about the issues they are currently most concerned with. The aim of our new series
entitled “Make Your Voice Seen” is to deliver the messages of these people to a
broader public.

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