Get a penalty for doing your job!

Budai Gyula is a public employee in Ózd (town in Hungary). His job is to keep the recycling bins in order. He received a penalty for 10.000 HUF for scavenging, while he was doing his job. He acted correctly by not acknowledging his supposed offence by his signature. If he had done so, he could not argue against the decision. Do not sign anything if you have not committed what you’re being charged for!

For English subtitles: start the video and click on the "cc" button!

Most people hardly hear or know anything about the living conditions and everyday concerns of the Roma population living in extreme poverty, often in segregated settlements.

During their visits in North-Eastern Hungary, our colleagues interview locals about the issues they are currently most concerned with. The aim of our new series entitled “Make Your Voice Seen” is to deliver the messages of these people to a broader public.

Share

Related articles

Sajóbábony through the eyes of a Gypsy man

There was a clash in Sajóbábony on November 15, 2009, between Roma people and people wearing the uniform of the disbanded Hungarian Guard. In this video we can learn about the events from the point of view of a local Roma young man.

I am afraid to speak up

Roma travelling by bicycle in Kesznyéten are systematically fined for trivialities and receive disproportionate fines for minor offences. When our film crew visited Kesznyéten, they interviewed non-Roma cyclists as well. Out of these randomly chosen 10 individuals there was only one person who had received a fine for a cycling offence. Even though on average (as seen in the accompanying video), their bicycles were not in better condition or better equipped. Still, the Non-Roma travelling by bicycle are not even stopped by the police.

Garbage trucks do not enter Gypsy settlement

It is a common occurrence in Borsod county in Hungary, that where the Gypsy settlements begin, paved roads end. There is no running water or sewage system, and the local government does not provide waste removal services.
Such areas are treated as if they were not public places, as though the communal and civil service obligations of the local governments stopped at the borders of the Gypsy settlements.