HCLU welcomes the court's ruling in the Conscience 88 Group case

The Hungarian Civil Liberties Union (HCLU) acknowledges with content that the court already in two cases ruled against the police in the issue of whether the police had lawfully cancelled an event or not.

In a previous Conscience 88 Group (Lelkiismeret 88 Csoport) case in 2003 the court declared that the police's action of canceling the event organized by the 88 Group was against the law.

Similarly in the most recent Conscience 88 Group case the court declared that to forbid the organization of the event according to the original plans was unlawful. The court of the first instance ruled in favor of the police, but the appellate court declared that the event could have been held according to the original plans of the Group.

In HCLU's opinion these rulings have significance for various reasons. It's significance on one hand is that the constitutional right of freedom of assembly is fulfilled, and on the other hand is that finally it was the court that arrived to the conclusion that the police had violated the constitutional rights of a group of people.

 

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