Hungarian NGO Launches Freedom of Education Program

The Hungarian public education system has fundamentally changed due to the 2011 adoption of the Act on National Public Education and other related legislation. Considering the severe infringements of children's rights and the curtailing of the autonomy of teachers and institutions, the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union has decided to extend its legal defense activities to this field as well. In the framework of its Freedom of Education Program, the NGO provides legal advice and representation free of charge.

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