NGOs Reject "Safe Harbor 2.0," Urge EU and US to Protect Fundamental Rights

Leading human rights and consumer organizations have issued a letter to urge the US and the EU to protect the fundamental right to privacy. 

After the Schrems decision the parties are now renegotiating the invalidated Safe Harbor arrangement. The groups warned that without significant changes to "domestic law" and "international commitments," a Safe Harbor 2.0 will almost certainly fail. NGO leaders call for a comprehensive privacy framework in the US, commitment to strong encryption and ending mass surveillance on both sides of the Atlantic.

Read the letter here.

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