Rapper Cleared, Case Closed

The investigation into the misdemeanor crime against Hungarian rapper Dopeman was closed, after it was found that a misdemeanor crime against a national symbol, namely the Hungarian National Anthem, was not committed.

As previously reported, after police received anonymous calls and e-mails from citizens who were upset by the rap song, the rapper was summoned to the police station and questioned as a witness after coming out with his song which contained lines from the Hungarian National Anthem.

According to the police ’in the music video, the performer expresses his critique on the current political, economical and social situation, in his own favored musical style. It is a fact that he uses obscene words to stress his opinion. (…) However, offensive and derogatory expressions or behavior unmistakably and directly aimed at the national anthem, either in the video or audio of the music clip can not be determined. Obscene words used to emphasize negative critique were found to not to be in relation to the national anthem, therefore the crime itself cannot be determined.’

’The performers gestures and behavior do not imply intent of offending or degrading the national anthem. For instance, it can be seen in the music clip, that the performer places his hand over his heart during lines from the national anthem.’

’It is unclear why the prosecutor’s office launched the investigation, as it was apparent that the crime reported by anonymous callers did not take place’ – said Andrea Pelle, Head of the HCLU’s Legal Aid Service and legal counsel for the rapper.

Dopeman was heard as a witness in December, but he refused to answer to most questions, stating that it is his belief that no crime was committed, but since the prosecutor does believe a crime did take place, he would like to live by his right not to incriminate himself.

The police investigation reaffirms the HCLU’s previously stated opinion: the misdemeanor crime against a national symbol did not take place. In order to determine that a crime did indeed take place, it would have to have been proved that the offensive expression was directly aimed at the national anthem. No offensive or degrading expressions were used in relation to the national anthem, the expression ’fuck’, however was directly aimed at political parties, politicians and even parking tickets.

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