Resisting ill democracies in Europe

From emerging democracies in transition, illiberal governments have rapidly transformed Hungary and Poland into ill democracies, have attempted to do so in Croatia, and are slowly and carefully entertaining an illiberal platform in Serbia, according to the new case study Resisting Ill Democracies in Europe. The findings, published in EnglishCroatianHungarianPolish, and Russian by a group of human rights organisations, are based on their study of ill democracy in Croatia, Hungary, Poland, and Serbia.

Coming at a crucial time for civil society and democracy, the authors identify the main trends within ill democracies, and offer practices and strategies for civil society to resist.

The case study finds and documents that illiberal governments threaten the very structural elements of functioning democracies, transforming what were successful democratic countries into democracies that are sick. 

It draws on the first-hand information and research provided by non-governmental organisations (NGOs) from the four countries, benefitting from their diverse national perspectives and different realities. It is published by the Centre for Peace Studies (Croatia), Helsinki Foundation for Human Rights (Poland), Hungarian Civil Liberties Union, Hungarian Helsinki Committee, Yucom – Lawyers’ Committee for Human Rights (Serbia), Human Rights House Zagreb, and Human Rights House Foundation.

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