Analysis on how Hungary's draft NGO law would violate EU law

The Civil Liberties Union for Europe, the European Center for Not-for-Profit Law (ECNL), the Hungarian Helsinki Committee and the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union jointly developed a legal analysis of Hungary's proposed law targeting independent civil society organisations.

The proposed NGO law would violate EU law on anti-money laundering and terrorist financing as well as free movement of capital.

The legislation would also infringe fundamental European and international human rights standards. Specifically, the law would interfere with the right to protection of personal data, freedom of expression and association. It would severely hamper the core functions of NGOs by imposing extremely severe sanctions for non-compliance and undermining public trust in NGOs.

Please download the full analysis from here.

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