Analysis on how Hungary's draft NGO law would violate EU law

The Civil Liberties Union for Europe, the European Center for Not-for-Profit Law (ECNL), the Hungarian Helsinki Committee and the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union jointly developed a legal analysis of Hungary's proposed law targeting independent civil society organisations.

The proposed NGO law would violate EU law on anti-money laundering and terrorist financing as well as free movement of capital.

The legislation would also infringe fundamental European and international human rights standards. Specifically, the law would interfere with the right to protection of personal data, freedom of expression and association. It would severely hamper the core functions of NGOs by imposing extremely severe sanctions for non-compliance and undermining public trust in NGOs.

Please download the full analysis from here.

Share

Related articles

How not to commit “scaremongering”?

Sharing true facts or your opinion is not a crime. In this factsheet we've gathered what to keep in mind when discussing Covid-19 issues.

The Right to Protest: New online project

OpenDemocracy, CELS and INCLO are launching a new minisite on The Right to Protest, with support from the ACLU.

HCLU called OGP to investigate the situation in Hungary

Last fall, the Open Government Partnership (OGP) adopted a new policy to help re-establish an environment for government and civil society collaboration, safeguarding the Open Government Declaration and to mitigate reputational risks to OGP. Today, members of Hungarian civil society, including representatives of the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union, Transparency International Hungary and K-Monitor, as well as Sunlight’s international policy manager, a former employee of K-Monitor, called on the OGP Steering Committee to take action under the new policy and launch a thorough investigation into the situation in Hungary, with a special attention to the deterioration of the space for civil society.