Court hearing in the case of the “building-occupiers”

The first court hearing for the misdemeanor case of the Centrum Activists Group (Centrum Csoport) was held on January 11, 2006. The group of young people was charged with misdemeanor for occupying an empty building, owned by the local government. The building has been abandoned and neglected by the local government for 5 years. The aim of the occupiers was to set up a cultural, social and art centre in the abandoned building.

The 41 activists charged with the misdemeanor are represented by the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union’s (HCLU) legal aid service.

On the first court hearing all members of the Centrum Activists Group who were charged, admitted to take part in the occupation of the building. All of them claimed to take the responsibility and all possible consequences of their conduct.

The curiosity of the case is that not only the activists but also the journalists who were reporting from the scene were charged and had to appear in front of the court.

According to HCLU this case should serve as a precedent. HCLU shares the opinion of the Centrum Activists Group, that the social benefit of their conduct overrules the damage that occurred. Therefore, HCLU will request to exonerate the activists from the charges.

The next court hearing will be held on March 13, 2006.

 

Share

Related articles

The HCLU Is Dismayed at the FIDESZ-fraction's Cordon-removal Action

The HCLU human rights organization would like to call attention to the fact, that even though the current situation at Kossuth square is undoubtedly due to the cynical, unlawful and unacceptable attitude of the police, in a democratic state there is no place for unlawful action even if authorities are believed to be behaving in an unlawful way.

A Court had to Overturn the Actions of the Police and the Counterterrorism Center

The Metropolitan Court of Budapest invalidated the decision of Budapest’s chief police officer that effectively banned an announced demonstration at the Prime Minister’s residence. The decision also found that closing the area, in order to prevent the demonstration, violated the law. The HCLU welcomes the decision by the court which stated that “limiting a peaceful demonstration because it is held in the presence of a high level official but otherwise serves as an expression of a political opinion is unnecessary in a democratic society.” 

Again, the Banning of the Budapest Pride March Requires Legal Remedy

With the legal help of the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union, the Rainbow Mission Foundation challenges the banning order issued by the Budapest Chief of Police.