Drugreporter’s Video Advocacy Training in New Zealand

After the AIDS conference in Melbourne, the New Zealand Drug Foundation invited us to hold a two-day video advocacy workshop in Auckland, New Zealand, and to deliver a presentation in Wellington.


The 14 participants invited by the New Zealand Drug Foundation were activists from various social fields. They had different levels of knowledge of video production and drug policy, so we aimed at providing a basic course that would be useful for everyone.

On the morning of the first day, Peter Sárosi presented an example of Drugreporter's video advocacy. 

HX7A0002-3

In the afternoon, István Gábor Takács explained how to prepare for video production, and how to make an advocacy plan. The participants then learned about the necessary equipment, camera settings, how to work with sound, framing, how to compose shots and finally, interview techniques. 



In the morning of the second day, participants interviewed each other and shot B-Rolls.

HX7A0069

In the afternoon they learned about editing on Premiere Pro CC and edited their own footage.

HX7A0006

To see the entire foto album, click here or on the picture:

HX7A0005

After two days of an intensive course in video advocacy, we travelled on to Wellington, where Peter gave a presentation of our drug policy work and video activism, for people working in the drugs and social work field in New Zealand. 


 

It was a great experience to work with such enthusiastic young activists. We thank the New Zealand Drug Foundation for their invitation, and we hope our work made a positive contribution to their important efforts.
István Gábor Takács and Péter Sárosi
Drugreporter

Share

Related articles

Government Must Stop HIV in Romania - TAKE ACTION!

We have produced a movie to raise awareness on the current outbreak of HIV/AIDS among injecting drug users in Romania. Please watch and share this video and take action to stop HIV!

Giving Hope to Drug Users in Moscow

Watch our movie on the Andrey Rylkov Foundation and support their fight for survival!

Garbage trucks do not enter Gypsy settlement

It is a common occurrence in Borsod county in Hungary, that where the Gypsy settlements begin, paved roads end.  There is no running water or sewage system, and the local government does not provide waste removal services.
Such areas are treated as if they were not public places, as though the communal and civil service obligations of the local governments stopped at the borders of the Gypsy settlements.