Help reform policies for the people with intellectual disability! Plan with us!

The Budapest Institute and the HCLU joined forces in preparing a proposal on the reform of issues concerning the  people with intellectual disability. Even though there are still 15.000  people with intellectual disability  and 8.000 people with mental disorders living in total institutions, Hungarian social policy did not even begin to work out action plans needed for the reform.

12 years ago, it was laid down by law that most of the total institutions have to be shut down. The deadline was set for January 1st, 2010, but to this day, thousands of people with mental and intellectual disability are living in total institutions crowded amongst hundreds of their peers.

Since past and current governments are not abiding by laws and human rights treaties, the Budapest Institute and the HCLU took it upon themselves to draft a proposal on the methods of terminating total institutions. The goal is to form a modern approach to social policies in order to better the social acceptance and inclusion of the  people with intellectual disability and to better their situation in the labor market.

It is our goal to reach a consensus among our partners and to convince social policy decision makers. We will strive to draft a plan based on scientific evidence, which could serve as a guideline for specific social policy reform.

The project will be public and can be monitored through the webpage tasz.hu/intezet-helyett (Hungarian only). We appreciate all suggestions and ideas persons with intellectual or mental disability, their families, experts in the field and NGOs! E-mail us at tasz@tasz.hu!

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