Newsletter Launch: Global Developments in Religious Freedom and Equal Treatment

The HCLU is pleased to announce the launch of a new quarterly newsletter: Global Developments in Religious Freedom and Equal Treatment. This newsletter, prepared by the International Network of Civil Liberties Organizations (INCLO), focuses on significant international developments, including cases and legislation, concerning religious freedom, equal treatment, and the intersection of the two.

In this newsletter, we hope to highlight significant international developments, including cases and legislation, concerning religious freedom, equal treatment, and the intersection of the two. This first issue discusses not only current cases, but also cases of particular significance from recent years concerning the following topics:
- religious freedom and reproductive rights;
- religious freedom and LGBT rights; and
- religious expression.
The first issue of the newsletter is available here (.pdf) >> 
INCLO’s members include:
American Civil Liberties Union
Association for Civil Rights in Israel
Canadian Civil Liberties Association
Centro de Estudios Legales y Sociales (Argentina)
Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights
Hungarian Civil Liberties Union
Irish Council for Civil Liberties
Kenya Human Rights Commission
Legal Resources Centre (South Africa)
Liberty (United Kingdom)

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