Information Note on the Hungarian Media Laws

The Hungarian Civil Liberties Union (HCLU) and the ARTICLE 19 Global Campaign For Free Expression prepared together an Information Note on the Hungarian Media Laws that enterted into force in January 2011.

 ARTICLE 19 is an independent human rights organisation that works around the world to protect and promote the right to freedom of expression. It takes its name from Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which guarantees free speech.

The two NGOs collaborated on this issue to explain how the new media laws have deteriorated the media situation in Hungary. The two NGOs have already published a number of opinions and statments calling on the Hungarian government and Pariament to bring about substantial changes. Up to now, in its current form the Media Laws still represent an important setback in media freedom in Hungary.

The Infromation Note explains in a clear and comprehensive manner inter alia what are the main problems with the laws; what reaction it sparked in Hungary and in Europe.

The Information Note is available form here in .pdf format.

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