No Substantive Ruling in the Amnesty International vs. National Police Headquarters Lawsuit

On July 13th, 2007 the Metropolitan Court returned its verdict in the Amnesty International (AI) vs. National Police Headquarters (NPH) lawsuit. The HCLU has taken on the legal representation of AI during the proceedings.

AI has sued the NPH for their practices during the visit of Lech Kaczynski, Head of the Republic of Poland in March, 2006. Civil organizations prepared for the welcoming of the Polish president by organizing demonstrations in response to his homophobic measures. The demonstrations were obstructed by the police without issuing a prohibitive order. The police set up cordons and did not allow the demonstrators to reach the previously reported locations.

The court, without substantially dealing with the matter, overruled the order of the NPH and has obligated them to re-conduct the process. It was the AI's and the HCLU's goal to stop the restrictive practices of the police and local governments, with which - by a simple administrative order - they restrict our basic rights.

 

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