The Helmet and Breast-plate Order Did Not Come in Force

The Hungarian Civil Liberties Union is pleased to acknowledge that the government has, just before it became valid, revoked the governmental decree amendment, which would have classified bullet and pierce-proof vests, helmets and breast-plates as equipment specifically dangerous to public safety.

On more than one occassion we have voiced our opinion in the press, that it is strange that the governmental decree issued on February 28th, 2007 would classify equipment used exclusively for self protection among such equipment dangerous to public safety as shurikens, loaded sticks, boxers or even electric shockers.

It was not made clear what would justify the wearing of such equipment on the street as an offence. We hope the revocation of the order is not just a technical legal move, but the government’s discretion at an unfounded amendment.

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