The Hungarian Constitutional Court annuled the restrictive order of the General Assembly of Budapest on the right of assembly

The Hungarian Civil Liberties Union (HCLU) welcomes the decision of the Constitutional Court, which abrogated the disposition modified on the 26th October 2006 of the decree 59/1995.

This modified order would have required a particular permission to the application of different kinds of buildings and equipments (stage, amplification system, etc.) in the case of events falling within the law on assembly.

The HCLU challenged the decree at the Constitutional Court in November 2006. The Constitutional Court accepted the point of view of HCLU, which said that the objected dispositions of the decree contravened the Constitution and concerned fundamental elements of the right to assembly, which could not have been restricted legally nor by law accepted by the Parliament.

The HCLU has not objected in its initiative the diposition which requires separate permission to merchandising, hostible activity and advertising at political events. In our point of view these activities do not bear closely upon the assert of the right to assembly, and thus the regulation by on decree is not opposing the Constitution. This disposition was not overruled by the Constitutional Court.

 

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