They threaten and that‘s all

The police dissolved the prosecution related to the Internet Jewish DataBase service ran by Matula Magazin. The investigation of the Jewish database based on pure guessing started three months ago against one of the editors of the journal, accusing him with misuse of specific personal information.

Defense in the process was provided by Dr. Andrea Pelle, leader of HCLU’s Legal Advocacy Service. The abandon of the procedure by the prosecutor, resulted of the lack of elements to fulfill the charge of misuse of personal information and of the fact that the committed act was not criminal, is another example of the ‚they threaten, they threaten and nothing happens‘-type actions.

The infamous Sickratman song ‚Turn to the left‘ evoked similar reactions by the lawyers last spring. The prosecution was then also started against Sickratman, and dissolved after one month, this time being enough for the police to state the lack of deliquency.

This time we received the resolution to close it down on 14 June, three months after the investigation started. One may decide if the computers of the Matula Magazin’s editor were fine in the police storage, and if the taxpayers‘ 180,000 forints were spent efficiently in the process launched after the denunciation made by the 'Jobbik Movement for Hungary'.

We cannot resist to note, instead of further comments, the final lines of the HCLU announcement published in March: ‚According to the HCLU’s standpoint, the threatening of the freedom of speech and expression is inacceptable when it is clear from the very beginning that the procedures ran by taxpayers‘ money will end with the clear dissolution of the investigation.‘

 

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