'We don't want welfare, but jobs'

There is no bad work, the important thing is to have a job. This is what a young man from Hétes settlement talks about, in our video.

For English subtitles: start the video and click on the "cc" button!

Most people hardly hear or know anything about the living conditions and everyday
concerns of the Roma population living in extreme poverty, often in segregated
settlements.
During their visits in North-Eastern Hungary, our colleagues interview locals
about the issues they are currently most concerned with. The aim of our new series
entitled “Make Your Voice Seen” is to deliver the messages of these people to a
broader public.

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