Without a Chance - The experiences of the HCLU's Romaprogram

The documentary produced by the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union, a human rights watchdog NGO in Budapest, introduces to the viewer the most common rights violations that Roma people suffer in Hungary.

Through the footage filmed over three years in the North-Eastern part of Hungary by the HCLU, we get to know how discrimination is present in all aspects of life of Roma people: disadvantages at the labour market, discrimination at municipalities, by the police and by the judicial system. We witness how hate crime against Roma is tolerated, and how the law that was originally introduced to protect minorities is in real life used against them. Finally we show how the segregation of Roma children at the Hungarian school system makes sure that they Roma people live with us "Without a Chance."



 
The Hungarian page is available here: http://tasz.hu/eselytelenul
The original article where the movie was published is available here: http://index.hu/belfold/2013/12/10/eselytelenul_film/

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