Disgraceful Letter from Deputy Ombudsman

Albert Takács, Deputy Ombudsman of the Parliament has rejected the complaint of the HCLU's attorney in the matter of special healthcare for autists. The HCLU voices its outrage over the letter.

Levente Baltay, the HCLU's advocacy attorney, has in his letter brought attention to the fact, that therapy for people suffering from an aggressive form of autism is not settled and for this, a special healthcare institution is needed. Albert Takács, acting human rights general officer of the Parliament, in his reply has stated lack of jurisdiction and did not order an investigation into the matter. However, the spurn of the investigation did not stop him from making the comment: 'the above mentioned problem of Hungary not having such special healthcare institutions that specialize in the therapy of extreme cases of autism cannot be connected to human rights violations.'

It is the deputy ombudsman's opinion that the above mentioned problem is primarily a 'political-healthcare and within this, a financial question' and he also did not fail to mention to the attorney handing him the complaint, that in view of the financial status of the healthcare system, he personally does not see a chance for development in this field or any other special fields (including therapy for youths abusing drugs) in the near future.

The HCLU is appaled at the above reasoning. The HCLU finds it unacceptable that a deputy exclusively for the parliament and reporting to the parliament conduct such reasoning and are also outraged that his opinion is not based upon the law and the constitution.

The HCLU believes that without further investigation, this matter will not be solved.

 

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