Disrespect for European Values in Hungary, 2010-2014

The European Union (EU) is premised on the respect for human dignity, freedom, democracy, equality, the rule of law, and human rights— including the rights of persons belonging to minorities. EU Member States share these values: they are societies committed to pluralism, the prohibition of discrimination, tolerance, justice, solidarity, and gender equality. Lately, these fundamental values have been systematically disrespected in Hungary.

This analysis, which has been prepared by four Hungarian NGOs (the Eötvös Károly Policy Institute, the Hungarian Helsinki Committee, the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union and the Mérték Media Monitor) assesses the current deficiencies of the rule of law, democracy, pluralism and respect for human rights in Hungary.

Tha assessment is available here >> (.pdf)

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