Freedom of Assembly

Pride is Free, Court Puts Police Back in Its Place

On 23 April the Tribunal of the Capiptal overruled and repealed the decision of the Budapest Police Chief, which had previously banned the Budapest Pride March. Similarly to last year, the court accepted the arguments of the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union's lawyer and rejected the 13-page-long justification of the police. The court ruled that there is no valid legal reason to prohibit the Pride March on the announced route.

Again, the Banning of the Budapest Pride March Requires Legal Remedy

With the legal help of the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union, the Rainbow Mission Foundation challenges the banning order issued by the Budapest Chief of Police.

HCLU Wins Freedom of Assembly Case at Capitol Court

The Hungarian Capitol Court has overruled two police orders prohibiting trade unionists from demonstrating in front of the Parliament and the Buda Castle on the first weekend of October. The Capitol Court fully shared the HCLU’s opinion that the reasoning of the police was faulty and their prohibiting measures were unfounded. The planned demonstrations will be held. 

Human Rights Organizations’ Petition to the Constitutional Court to Annul the “Nullity Act“

 The Hungarian Helsinki Committee (HHC) and the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union (HCLU) request the Constitutional Court to annul Act XVI of 2011 on the redress of the verdicts in connection with the crowd controls in the autumn of 2006 in a joint petition. According to the human rights organizations the act severely violates the rule of law and juridical independence. 

Budapest Pride March to the Parliament Given Green Light

 The Metropolitan Court granted the appeal of the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union and the Hungarian Helsinki Committee and overruled the prohibiting decision of the police. Thus the participants of the Budapest Pride can march from Heroes’ Square to Kossuth Square in 2011.

Letter to the Minister of Justice and Law Enforcement

The HCLU has written a letter to Tibor Draskovics, Hungarian Minister of Justice and Law Enforcement, to question why private security services were allowed to check identities and search the clothing of citizens during the March 15th National State Ceremonies.